WORDS: ROB KENT

For a band that has been present for a whole tidal wave of changes to their respected genre since forming, The Devil Wears Prada have now released their seventh full length record ‘The Act’ and with it the band have took on the motion of change while also still maintaining their legendary status. “We totally wanted to re-write the book on how we write songs, how they are structurally and dabble with instrumentation in ways that we never have before to make a Prada record that nobody has heard before”.

The conscious effort to produce a record as diverse as ‘The Act’ stems from the bands current view on the modern metal core scene. “It is not as inventive as it deserves to be, metal and rock these days don’t try as often as other genres, they stick to the same formula. So on ‘The Act’ we wanted to challenge the genre to be more creative and go further outside the box. But we driven to keep going and not hang this up and we love playing live and express ourselves through this band” showing they still see music as a powerful force and are determined to keep it that way for as long as they can, for themselves, and hope others involved in the genre follow their example.

“ we wanted to challenge the genre to be more creative and go further outside the box.”

Musically the band have pushed themselves further also, taking influence from the greats of the genre, again setting themselves apart from other modern releases. “New bands are just doing what Unearth did twenty years ago, thats why I’m not listening to it” they have stuck to their original influences and looked back deeper in to the genres roots “One band that so definitely metal core, even if it at the same the term was hardly being used, is a band called ‘In hopes Eyes”. They have a record called ‘Un-doing Ruin’ it’s still a record that I can still go back to and still appreciate how good it is”. Combining this original sound with lyrics based on the book “Never Come Morning” by Nelson Algren, ‘The Act’ is a metalcore record like we have never heard before, it is ambitious, creative and makes a statement in every way, showing the endless limits of the genre.

This stems from the recording process of the ‘The Act’ , with it being as intense as it was comfortable .”This record took half the time to make compared to Transit Blues, you would think this would higher the stress and create a more hectic situation but it didn’t. It helps we are quite disciplined about getting jobs done, we work so hard. All the rhythm sections were tracked live also which brings more life and a different kind of energy on this record. The vocals were also way easier to record, our producer know my capabilities and I really appreciated that”.

Mike has also never felt more confident with his voice and over time and has truly become grateful for talent and sees the endless capabilities of what screaming in to a microphone can be. “My vocals have evolved and grown, to scream in a band is such an instrument much more so than being a talented melodic singer. In that result there is no reason to be complacent with it.”

“It helps we are quite disciplined about getting jobs done, we work so hard”

Although the band is now focusing on ‘The Act’ they still value the majority of their career and celebrate when necessary, but also have an opinion on the current anniversary tour surge in recent years. “We did Roots Above because it was our most successful selling record and we still play a lot of songs in our set from that album and we are very comfortable with it. I get when people are  like “not every record needs a ten year tour” because everyone is doing it. But if there was one it would have to be Dead Throne. There has been some anniversary tours that I approve of and I’m not apologetic for doing the record we did as it is an important record of its time.”

And if one word could be used to describe what is now arguably the coming forefathers of their genre, it’s unbreakable.

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