WORDS: BECTON SIMPSON

“The scene’s great out here,” enthused Kurt Nubbemeyer, guitarist with Philadelphia pop punkers Midfield. The five piece who have “technically been going since 2015” are Phily boys through and through and are starting to make some waves on their local scene. “All the bands around us are really talented and always respectful,” drummer Tyler Patchell told us. “Everyone just wants to support each other and it’s a really positive scene.”
“We want each other to succeed,” agreed Kurt.

That’s certainly a helpful attitude to have especially when dealing with something so traditionally oversaturated as the pop punk genre, but the guys tell us they don’t find it so difficult to stand out from the crowd where that’s concerned. “I like to think where some of the genre is mellowing out we’re keeping up the energy,” said Kurt. “We’re heavily influenced by the old and the new and I feel like we capture that pretty well as to be one of the few that successfully strike that balance.”

“I think music really helps connect people and makes the world a little less lonely”

Despite their older influences though, they bill themselves as ‘not your father’s pop punk band’, marking themselves out from the old guard a little. “We’re basically saying we’re newer…or not what you’ve been listening to,” Kurt explained the tongue in cheek catchphrase before going on to reflect upon the differences between the older pop punk bands and the ones coming up today. “I’d say maybe the delivery was different than it is today. The music, melodies and lyrics just felt simpler back then, and I don’t mean that to diminish any of those bands. But if you play a Blink song next to a Wonder Years, State Champs or Knuckle Puck song there’s a glaring difference in vocal and instrumental delivery.”

The topics and themes covered by pop punk bands then and now was also sometimes different. “They dealt with not fitting in and getting dumped,” said Kurt. And while some bands did deal with deeper issues such as mental health and depression, those are topics close to the hearts of Midfield and something they try to explore in their music. “Mental health is a pretty big topic that I personally like to cover,” lead vocalist Matt Kelly tells us. “We all struggle and I think music really helps connect people and makes the world a little less lonely.”
“My thing is typically self reflection,” Kurt inputted. “A lot of times I write my lyrics to sound like it’d be directed at someone else, but usually they’re directed internally.”

“we would just like to create a community of fans that can forget all the hardship going on in the world, relate to our music, and have some fun at our shows.”

Musically, the band are working on a brand new EP which develops and builds upon their previous self-releases. “I’d definitely say if nothing else it’s gotten more mature, musically and lyrically,” said Kurt, with Matt adding, “The writing process has gotten more collaborative with all the members of the band. Midfield started with just Kurt and I, so adding more members and getting their influences has really helped our sound and changed the way we write.”

Now moving forward as a five-piece, they’re hoping to continue to develop and grow, and play some more gigs further afield. “The dream is to get a following in Japan, but I would love it hit the UK,” Matt said. “We have some awesome fans out there and it’s just a great scene. The long term aim if the band is get signed and all over the world. But really, we would just like to create a community of fans that can forget all the hardship going on in the world, relate to our music, and have some fun at our shows.” Some exciting things have been happening to the band recently too, including “playing an emo night at Xfinity Live to roughly 600 people, and getting a small write up in Alt Press.” Here’s hoping the guys go from strength to strength and manage to achieve their goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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