FROM: LONDON | FOR FANS OF: BLINK-182, SUM 41

Whilst pop punk might need defending, this is never more apparent than when opinion sets its sights on emerging UK talent. Sure, we’re not going to deny that it’s an oversaturated genre, but branding every backwards cap, power chording, socially awkward guy stuck in his home town a poor and shameless plagiarisation of their American counterparts is just disregarding a new wave of talent before they can make their impression.

But The Bottom Line play this to their advantage, keeping their influences close without aggressively shaking them like a piggy bank with the last gang vocal stuck inside. “There are so many good bands that came before us,'” humbly states vocalist Callum Amies. “We didn’t want to totally wear our influences on our sleeve but, I think that we have a bit of an old school sound, whilst still giving people something new and exciting.”

“we have a bit of an old school sound, whilst still giving people something new and exciting.”

“Its a fun kind of sound,” continues Callum, discussing how The UK outfit are very much rooted in the genre’s roots. “I just think that it has been done so many times before and we had to deliver something different.”

But this homage to predecessors isn’t just limited to their instrumental direction, but tied to the band’s inception. With the outfit emerging for school jam sessions, writing music in garages and a trial and error trail of past projects.

“When we first started out it wasn’t taken very seriously,” laughs Callum, “it was like we would just see how much we could drink whilst still being able to play, it was fun but we have had to calm it down a bit.”

“we would just see how much we could drink whilst still being able to play”

Saying that they want to remind everyone that its “not just doom and gloom,” with the upcoming release for their forthcoming album “No Vacation”, the lads decided to take the tried and tested pop punk songwriting formula and diversify. “It’s a new direction for us.”

In a genre overflowing with easy creative comparisons, colossal expectations to exceed and a surviving slither of the glamorous rockstar lifestyle. Pop punk needs to adapt and The Bottom Line seem poised to welcome in a new era.

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