WORDS: YASMINE SUMMANN

“There’s no place like home” that statement has always echoed into fragments of my life. After watching Judy Garland brace into the unknown with nothing but sparkly shoes and her dog from Victor Flemmings 1939 masterpiece, I always found myself wondering how she battled the daunting unknown with such pride and yet at the heart of it all was her home.

Again, I found myself coming back to that statement as we followed British alt-pop outfit Lizzie Farrall on her jump across the waters as she gears up to record her forthcoming album all the way in New York. Like Dorothy in Oz, Farrall explained that she feels like in one big dream, “It’s been my lifelong dream to go to the states, especially New York. I never thought music would be my ticket to get there.”

“I NEVER THOUGHT MUSIC WOULD BE MY TICKET TO GET THERE…”

New York has always been the epicentre for art and creativity, lending contribution to fashion, social movements as well as music, influencing the likes of Patti Smith and Blondie.“I haven’t directly named the city in any of the songs but a few of the tracks make you picture big city nightlife, and being around New York City really helped my ideas come to life”, Farrall explains as she delves into her influences on her upcoming work. Discussing her work with Brett Romnes who helped with her first track ‘Makeup Sex’ and the incorporation of new elements like saxophones on future tracks she says, “Brett is a big fan of British music and his band have spent of lot of time in the UK, so with his knowledge we have been able to still maintain a very British sound with this record. I’m also a huge fan of a lot of 80’s bands/artists and the saxophone was such a part of that sound. My album has influences of the 80’ s so when we were tracking, something screamed out to me that there needed to be saxophone on the record”

“I’ve been very emotional while recording and every time I step into the vocal booth it’s felt almost like a therapy session.”

Being so far from home can open you to an air of vulnerability, especially as an upcoming female solo artist who has to fight tooth and nail for her spot in this industry, like a cub being thrown into a lion’s den.  When times are hard emotions get high and this has been one hell of an emotional rollercoaster to success for Farrall, “I briefly mentioned before, I’ve been very emotional while recording and every time I step into the vocal booth it’s felt almost like a therapy session. Writing music has as always been cathartic for me. Gives me the opportunity to use my thoughts and feelings in a creative and healthier way.”

Moving away is part of the growing pains of becoming a musician, taking your first steps from home and into the shark tank of life teaches you very quickly to fend for yourself. “I have had to grow up pretty fast and become more confident, put myself first to follow my dreams and accept that no matter what you do in life you can’t please everyone.” Farrall adds as she reflects on her rise into the industry as a solo artist, particularly a female solo artist who’s fighting in an industry that will still degrade and belittle her based on her gender.

“I can’t wait for a time when everyone is judged on their skills rather than their gender or race”

 “I can’t wait for a time when everyone is judged on their skills rather than their gender or race etc . As much as we need to highlight all forms of discrimination in all industries and hopefully soon there will be a day when these questions won’t need to be asked.  

Farrall will follow up from her 2016 EP ‘All I Said I Never Heard’ with her forthcoming untitled work coming very soon. Fans already have a taste of what’s to come with explorative tracks ‘Barbados’ and ‘Make-up Sex’. All she can say for now in regards to the new record is “I don’t think it’s what people are expecting it to be.”  

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