FROM: SEATTLE, WASHINGTON | FOR FANS OF: YOUTH OF TODAY, BLIND AUTHORITY

Sometimes it tastes so sweet when hardcore goes back to their punk roots with stomp laden riffs and mosh call outs. We caught up with Jeff Caffey this week to discuss the culture of hardcore and how it’s propelling Odd Man Out into notoriety in the worldwide scene.

“’It pulls influences from emotional anger, and I try to communicate it in the most extreme way through a modern lens.’’

‘’I would describe it as dynamic’’ Jeff begins to describe the new LP. ‘’It’s hard to put an exact finger on, and I hope in a good way!’’ The record goes in a lot of directions I’m excited about. Personally, I think of it’s got its own sound.’’ Jeff certainly hasn’t shied away from his own personal experiences in terms of the lyrical content ‘’It pulls influences from emotional anger, and I try to communicate it in the most extreme way through a modern lens.’’

Hardcore has so many roads. For some it is a bridge from metalcore, and others from punk. It has a place for fans of all ages. For Jeff, hardcore has been a source of positivity from day dot ‘’My first tour I was 17 and I paid out of pocket to tour pretty much until I was 25 years old.’’ That said, hardcore wasn’t always as widely distributed as it is nowadays. ‘’You couldn’t search “hardcore” on the internet and find anything but pornography. I liked street punk, 77 punk and metal because of friends, but hardcore was nowhere to be found. By the time I became familiar with the term I remember buying an O.G. Life’s Blood Defiance for $18 and thinking that was a criminal price. You had to read zines, buy records and talk to older guys at record shops.’

” You had to read zines, buy records and talk to older guys at record shops.’’

Odd Man Out owe their trajectory not only to their own love of the genre and songwriting ability, but their peers too ‘’Now that we’re a real band with a real touring lineup we’ve toured with a lot of bands and gotten support from Protester, Power, Gag, Lower Species, Angel Du$t, Turnstile, Trapped Under Ice, Firewalker, Raw Brigade (Colombia). Those bands specifically have very special places in our hearts and have always been supportive of us in all ways. We owe a lot to those people.’’

Although hardcore has been a force for good in Jeff’s life, he understands that hardcore can be problematic at times ‘’It’s insane to be competitive in hardcore. You’re king of the losers essentially, and bickering over individual interests is not worth anyone’s time at all.’’ Jeff also explains how his feeling of unity towards others is not necessarily based on hardcore ‘’If you feel marginalized or subjected to your world in a way that makes your existence feel like suffering, I will feel a sense of “unity” with you.’’

“‘’It’s insane to be competitive in hardcore. You’re king of the losers essentially…”

We discuss the motivations behind Odd Man Out and Jeff is transparent in his convictions ‘’The primary drive behind Odd Man Out is a distaste for the modern global economy and an extreme disapproval of how people treat each other and neglect the responsibility of their actions.’’

Including playing one of their biggest shows to date at Outbreak Fest, hardcore has created countless opportunities for Jeff that he would not have otherwise been able to embrace ‘’It’s some of my best friends in the world and we’ve gotten to spend extensive time all over the states, Mexico, South America, Europe, Canada and hopefully more places in the future. Experiencing that time together with my friends is invaluable to me. Meeting people who feel just as burdened by what I feel in Odd Man Out is invaluable to me because I’ve always felt so alone in the social world.

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